Sep 21, 2017 | Updated: 07:21 PM EDT

Take Notes More Conveniently With The Wacom Bamboo Spark

Sep 08, 2015 07:36 PM EDT

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Wacom Bamboo Spark
A woman uses her Wacom Bamboo Spark, with an iPhone on it, as displayed on Wacom's introductory post regarding the device.

With everybody practically tethered to their digital devices of choice nowadays, forgetting what it feels like to actually write on paper is a very real “problem” of sorts. Wacom, however, plans to help you get the best of both worlds: Enter the Wacom Bamboo Spark, which records what a user writes on paper, and digitizes it for saving to an iPhone, an iPad, or the user’s Android tablet of choice.

The Wacom Bamboo Spark’s technology is composed of two parts: The Bamboo Spark pen, which comes with real ink and will allow you to write or draw onto a piece of paper up to a standard A5 sheet up to 5.83 inches x 8.27 inches size, and the Bamboo Spark built-in Electro-Magnetic Resonance board, which is encased in a neoprene folio case that comes in three variants: the Smart folio with snap-fit for iPad Air 2, the Smart folio with tablet sleeve, and the Smart folio with gadget pocket, which fits either a phone or more sheets of paper.

The Wacom Bamboo Spark can record up to 100 pages of notes or drawings. A single charge of the pen can yield up to eight hours of battery life for continuous use, so the device is perfect for taking notes for a full workday, or an eight-hour stretch of classes. For most university and post-graduate students who have breaks in between classes, this may be sufficient to work with a whole day’s worth of class load.

Any of the three types of Wacom Bamboo Spark folio and pen sets cost $159.95 on the Wacom store, and orders worth $50 and above enjoy free shipping.

Parents of the previous generation may find the Wacom Bamboo Spark a frivolity, but for students born into the social media age, this may well be a crucial necessity. Imagine the possibilities of sharing your notes via email: No need to scan each page painstakingly, converting those into PDF, and stringing them together in another PDF program. One can just take the notes from the Wacom Bamboo Spark, and share them immediately via Evernote, Dropbox, or keep them for editing later via the Wacom Inkspace platform.

If you’re the designated note-taker in class, your unpaid task just got easier.

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