Jul 15, 2019 | Updated: 04:55 PM EDT

Motorola X Leak: July 4th Independence Day Targeted Advertisement Shows Unique Features, Made In America [REPORT]

Jul 04, 2013 11:33 AM EDT

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The Motorola X is not the Nexus 5 nor is it even a flagship phone but it is the first smartphone to be built in the US since…well…ever. Yes, the phone will be constructed and assembled almost entirely in the United States at a Motorola facility in Fort Worth Texas. It is a mid-range device with some interesting and powerful sensors and according to ABC news it comes with some powerful customization options:

“Through a website, buyers will be able to select from a palette of different colors. One color can be used for the back case and another can be selected for the trim of the phone. Users will also be able to engrave a name or message on the back cover as well as upload a personal photo through the site to be used as the wallpaper on the phone's screen, according to people familiar with the rollout.”

Motorola touted the handset in a recent ad on July 3rd playing up the Independence Day and American patriotism angle. The following full page ad ran in The New York Times, USA Today, wall Street Journal and Washington Post.

It is still too soon to say much about how well the device will be received and if it will even retain the Motorola X name, but Motorola is running a cunning campaign in advance of Independence Day. Perhaps it will pay off. The Motorola X is not the Nexus 5 nor is it even a flagship phone but it is the first smartphone to be built in the US since…well…ever. Yes, the phone will be constructed and assembled almost entirely in the United States at a Motorola facility in Fort Worth Texas. It is a mid-range device with some interesting and powerful sensors and according to ABC news it comes with some powerful customization options:

“Through a website, buyers will be able to select from a palette of different colors. One color can be used for the back case and another can be selected for the trim of the phone. Users will also be able to engrave a name or message on the back cover as well as upload a personal photo through the site to be used as the wallpaper on the phone's screen, according to people familiar with the rollout.”

Motorola touted the handset in a recent ad on July 3rd playing up the Independence Day and American patriotism angle. The following full page ad ran in The New York Times, USA Today, wall Street Journal and Washington Post.

It is still too soon to say much about how well the device will be received and if it will even retain the Motorola X name, but Motorola is running a cunning campaign in advance of Independence Day. Perhaps it will pay off. 

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