May 22, 2017 | Updated: 01:56 PM EDT

Bose Faces Lawsuit for Spying Customers through Headphones, Speakers; Here’s How They Do It

Apr 20, 2017 08:38 PM EDT

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Bose faces a new lawsuit for allegedly spying on their customers with wireless headphone and tracking their music and other audio activities. This information are then used for monetary gain. The complaint was officially filed yesterday in Chicago federal court, asking for millions of dollars for damages to consumers of Bose merchandise.

Reuters reported that the lawsuit indicates Bose to spy on users through their Bose Connect app. This app is used to pair their Bose devices, including headphones and speakers, to the music source and manage all software update for their devices. Bose says using the app will allow users to maximize the use of their headphone. And in order to access the app, users must submit their name, email address, and headphone serial number.

If what the lawsuit claims are true, it looks like the only way for users to protect their privacy is by uninstalling the app. At least until a verdict has been decided that either proves or clears Bose from the accusation. Of course uninstalling the app will limit the use of the Bose devices so the decision is completely up to the user.

The lawsuit was filed by Kyle Zak and accuses the company of disregarding the privacy of users. All the data gathered from their merchandise are said to be sold for marketing research. Zak said Bose can send all of the media information from his mobile phone and send it anywhere they like. The lawsuit also includes the headphones and speakers affected namely QuietControl 30, QuietComfort 35, SoundLink Around-Ear Wireless Headphones II, SoundSport Wireless, SoundLink Color II, and SountSport Pulse Wireless, according to 9 to 5 Mac.

Data collection, especially without permission, is prohibited by the law under the federal Wiretap Act and Illinois laws against listening without permission and for consumer fraud. Bose has yet to comment on the accusation but is expected to give their defense anytime soon.